Medical Translation into Indic Languages

Medical translations require a great deal of skill and expertise at the best of times. Texts must be translated with extreme accuracy and according to a range of specific standards to ensure that no errors that could potentially have serious legal or even fatal consequences are made.

For most countries, translating a particular medical document typically means translating it into one specific national language. To translate, for instance, a user manual for medical equipment to be marketed across India, however, means getting the source language translated into a range of major Indian languages.

Every region of India has its own specific regional language, and with that, different ways of describing or referring to certain aspects of medical terms. This naturally requires specific knowledge of all the different variations and cultural differences within those regions and languages.

Translators will, among other things, have to have specific knowledge of certain terms used to describe particular conditions in different provinces.

A non-medical term or phrase used to describe the medical term ‘hypertension’ to make it more understandable for a patient, for example, may be totally different in Punjabi than it would be in Oriya, for instance.

Knowing these differences is vital to ensure that patients or their representatives are adequately informed and have no reason to sue a hospital or doctor for misinformation or in severe cases maybe even malpractice.

Most Indic language translation services will only translate documents into one or maybe two of these languages at a time, which means that the same document may have to be submitted to a whole list of agencies in order to get it localized for all areas within India.

We have assembled a team of highly trained experts that is able to translate a medical text of any kind from English into languages including Gujarati, Urdu, Hindi, Punjabi, Oriya and Bengali, as well as Tamil, Nepali, Malayalam, Kannada, Marathi and Telegu

http://www.indianscripts.com

Our team members are all not only highly trained translators and specialized in medical translations; they are also well versed in the individual cultural aspects, attitudes, styles, etc applicable to each of these varying regions.

This means our clients can have a text, such as manual instructions for medical devices and equipment and/ or software, marketing brochures, training curriculums or packaging labels translated and localized for just about every province within India under one roof, at the same price for each translation.

The range of documents we specialize in also includes any other toxicological, clinical, pharmaceutical or biological documents, as well as medical questionnaires, patient information documents, glossaries of medical terminology or individual informed consent forms.

In other words, whether a Hindi medical translation is required to inform a patient of his condition or whether a complete Indic language translation for a new pharmaceutical product is required, our experts will be able to perform the task to the client’s greatest satisfaction and to the highest standards.

Whatever your requirement, contact us  info@indianscripts.com now for an example of our work and/ or a quote.

3 Ways to Improve your Gujarati Vocabulary

Article written by Indianscripts,  Language Translation Provider (www.indianscripts.com) who can be contacted at info@indianscripts.com

Guajarati is a beautiful language and a mention of Guajarati brings alive the memories of Mahatma Gandhi and his famous “Vaishno Vachan”. This Indo- Aryan language has its derivation from Western Rajasthani and is spoken in not only the state of Gujarat but also in Dadra and Nagar Haveli and Daman and Diu.

One can easily divide Gujarati as Old Gujarati, Middle Gujarati and Modern Gujarati, which is what the present world is speaking. If you too have recently joined the Guajarati fan club and want to improve your vocabulary of the language, then this article would turn out to be the best source for sure.

When we talk about Modern Gujarati, the basic categories that we should know include tadbhav, tatsam and loan words.

Tatsam: Same

If you look at the meaning of Tatsam literally, it means “same as that.” We should remember that Sanskrit language transformed in Indo Aryan of Middle age eventually. Thus, you will find many words that resemble the Sanskrit words. They are as it is employed in Gujarati and mean the same thing as well. In fact, Gujarati vocabulary is enriched by such words which are technical and formal in nature. For instance, lekhak which means writer remains lakhnār and word vijetā meaning winner stays jītnār in Gujarati. In order to recognize such words, you can see the markings and inflections on top of them.

Tadbhav: Nature of that

Gujarati has descended from the ancient Indian language Sanskrit and thus in Tadbhav category of words; one may find words of Sanskrit origin. Thus, these words have over the time transformed to provide people with the same character as that of modern Indo- Aryan language of modern times.

The basic difference between the Tatsam and Tadbhav words is that while the earlier are technical and formal, latter are words that may be used every day and thus are non- technical. To learn the spoken vernacular of Gujarati, these words are quite essential.

One should however remember that while speaking Gujarati, Tatsam and Tadbhav can be employed simultaneously.

Videśī Words: Loan Words

The above mentioned two categories are entirely different from this one which consists of words of foreign origin including, English, Persian, Arabic, Turkish and Portuguese. Since India had Muslim rule for quite some time and they were a Persian speaking clad, the Indian languages had seen employment of many such words. Gujarati too could not escape conjugation of these words and thus there are many etymologically foreign words called loan words in Gujarati language.

Article written by Indianscripts,  Language Translation Provider (www.indianscripts.com) who can be contacted at info@indianscripts.com

The loan words were eventually indigenized and the output are terms like dāvo which means claim, natījo meaning result, fāydo  meaning benefit, and hamlo which means attack. It is interesting to note that all above mentioned words have a masculine gender while there are words which are neutral as well, e.g., khānũ – compartment.

Over the years times have seen a big contrast in everything and languages do not lag behind. The same holds true for Gujarati language too and thus it is essential for any Gujarati lover to learn the vocabulary first to improvise the language.

Article written by Indianscripts,  Language Translation Provider (www.indianscripts.com) who can be contacted at info@indianscripts.com

Journey of Hindi Language

Journey of  Hindi Language

Written by Indianscripts (www.indianscripts.com). Hindi is one of the many important languages that people can be found speaking mostly in Asian sub continent. Though, Hindi is the national language of India, Hindi speaking population is split all over the world.

The ancestral roots of Hindi are same as that of other European languages that even include English. The parent language of Hindi, according to the linguists, remains Indo-European, which persisted in the Central Asia. Here we are talking about the era of 5000 Century BC. This is the main reason other than the influence of British Raj in India that one can find many words in Hindi which have an equivalent in English language. To name a few, coolie, thug, loot, pundit, tom-tom etc.

Though, when it comes to belonging, Hindi language comes solely from Sanskrit. The classical Sanskrit is what it is believed to be initiated from. However, over a period of time, it acquired different dialects of Sanskrit only. The script in which Hindi is written is Dev Nagari. In fact, many of the Indian languages share their root from the same.

One may find the basic vocabulary of Hindi in Sanskrit as well and it is interesting to note that Urdu language too relates to Hindi. This relation is based upon their vocabulary and grammar which are more or less the same. In fact, there is a huge debate over linguists’ point of view regarding similarities of Urdu and Hindi and thus their being the same language. They believe that it is only the political scenario in India and Pakistan that separates the two languages which were spoken as Hindustani earlier in the secular India before partition.

Hindi language saw its development sometime around the colonial period alone. All the government offices during that era started having Hindi cultivated by the Britishers. Thereafter, the employment of Hindi language began in the literature and literary works that included poetry, prose and even novels. One could see many nationalists working for independence using Hindi language as the source and talking to the common man through newspapers, pamphlets etc.

Hindi got standardized basically after India got independence from foreign rule. The Indian government took over the task of standardization and by the year 1954 it was well completed. The Hindi grammar was developed by a committee that was set up by the government only. The very committee came up in the year 1958 with Basic Modern Hindi Grammar, which is being used today. Translation of literature from English into Hindi and Hindi to English was encouraged for knowledge enrichment.

The same committee also worked upon standardizing the spellings in the language and Central Hindi Directorate with cooperation of Ministry of Education and Culture came up with Devanagari script standardization. This had a great impact over the language and its usage because uniformity came in the character shapes and even in writing them. They also introduced scientific ways of scribing the alphabets. Also, diacritics were incorporated in order to express sounds in a better manner.

Thus, on January 26th, 1965 Hindi emerged as the Indian national language and the Constitution of India recognized as many as 21 other languages along with it.  This article waswritten by Indianscripts,  (www.indianscripts.com ) India’s leading Hindi translation services.

Editing Vs Proofreading What A Translator Should Know

EDITING VS PROOFREADING WHAT A TRANSLATOR SHOULD KNOW
Freelance translators have to wear several hats to perform their job well, some of the tasks have nothing to do with your knowledge of language; as in the case of listening to the client who is frustrated at a pressing deadline for the translation project.

Many times an agency for associate will ask you about taking proofreading or editing assignments in addition to translation. While the fee for these services may not be as much as translations, performing these tasks can increase your fluency and expertise. But these two tasks require different skills, some freelance translators can do both, others prefer one to the other:

A proofreader verifies that the text is true to the content from the source. This includes syntax, register and formatting. There is a set of proofreading symbols that are used to indicate errors or reference a suggestion. If you have a critical eye for detail and catch errors quickly, proofreading is a valuable skill that can add value to your services.

When you are editing, you are taking the text and re-writing it in a way that gives it a different perspective, while maintaining the integrity of the meaning of the content from the source. Editing may sound like a simple task however keep in mind that the continuity of the context of the subject has to be maintained for the length of the text.

In most cases, the good news is that most of these tasks are straight forward and can be done within a reasonable amount of time. On the down side, editing or proofreading a document that is poorly translated can easily turn into a time consuming exercise that results in lost profits for you.

If you cannot decide which of these services you want to offer to clients, work with another freelancer as a proofreader or editor to get a better feel for which one you do best.