KANNADA PROVERBS AND APHORISMS

 

Kannada has a vast and rich source of proverbs; they are mostly on the colloquial language and their origin could be as old as the language itself. They are mostly the sayings derived from the past experiences of the people about life; the sayings are full of wisdom and are intended to guide us through our life. The reliability of them is so sure that there is one proverb on the proverbs themselves- Veda sulladaru gaade sullagadu (Proverbs can never be proved wrong; they prevail even when Vedas could go wrong). From the past they have flowed from mouth to mouth without being actually recorded in any form, it was only in the later part of 19th century that some western scholars such as Col. Colin McKenzie, Rev. Ferdinand Kittel and J.F.Fleet began researching and recording some of the treasures of folk arts with respect to different and particular regions and also unique to some of the tribes and marginalized communities in Karnataka. After this many following western as well as Kannada scholars such as Mathigatta Krishnamurthy, D.Javaregouda, H.L.Nagegouda, Simpi Linganna, M.M.Kalburgi, Madenuru Sanganna, Chandrashekara Kambara and many others who realized the richness, relevance and life fullness of proverbs , gradually began collecting the available proverbs among the common people and have framed them in their collections. Continue http://www.indianscripts.com/Articles/KANNADA-PROVERBS-AND-APHORISMS.html

The Process of Medical Translation

Medical translations typically involve the translation of clinical, regulatory, technical and marketing documentation, software related documents or training courses for healthcare, medical device or pharmaceutical fields.

 

Countries around the globe require the translation of literature and labeling related to medical equipment or pharmaceuticals to be sold sold into their national languages.

 

In addition, documentation for clinical trials frequently has to be translated to allow local clinicians, patients and their representatives to read and subsequently understand them. The same applies to regulatory approval submissions.

 

Because medical texts are highly sensitive, technical and regulated, translators have to have specific training and extensive knowledge of medical and technical terms and procedures on top of their linguistic skills.

 

Because emphasis on high quality is very high due to the potential life and death implications of medical texts, translating agencies typically conform to at least one of a variety of standards, including the quality system standard (ISO 9001), the European standard of translation vendor quality (EN 15038) and/ or the standard of manufacture of medical equipment and devices (ISO 13485).

 

To ensure the translation of all medical texts are accurate and in perfect compliance with these high standards, translation takes place in a set of steps.

 

After the text to be translated from the source format, it is converted from the source language, let’s say English, into the target language, such as Urdu, for example.

 

This is done by highly trained translators using a variety of specialist tools and translation memory, a type of glossary used by translators to ensure the style of documents remains consistent.

 

The translated text is then read and edited by a second expert to ensure approved terminology, style and tone have been adhered to. Following this, the text is put into the required format, such as HTML, a word document, PDF, an e-learning program, etc.

 

This is followed by the document being proofread, ensuring that spelling, punctuation, page and line breaks are correct and no text has been corrupted. Finally, a so-called in-country review takes place.

 

This essentially means a native speaker of the language the text has been translated into reviews the document to ensure all specifications, product specifics or therapy specifics have been met correctly.

 

Our highly skilled experts adhere to these essential guidelines whenever they translate texts fro English into languages such as Bengali, Hindi, Gujarati, Urdu or Marathi; Telegu, Tamil, Malayalam, Oriya, Nepali, Kannada or Punjabi. www.indianscripts.com

 

 

The documents we specialize in translating include everything from brochures and packaging labels through user manuals, software and training documentation, medical questionnaires and glossaries of medical terms to patient information and informed consent forms.

 

In fact, any type of biological, clinical,  toxicological or pharmaceutical documents will be dealt with according to the same strict guidelines by our highly trained professional translators to ensure first class, accurate translations are produced at all times.

 

Don’t leave accuracy to chance – get a professional translating agency for your Indic language translation of important medical documents. It could, after all, save lives. www.indianscripts.com

 

KANNADA RESOURCES IN INTERNET: DICTIONARY, FONTS, SOFTWARE

 

 

Some experts opine that for a language as Kannada, the winner of eight Jnanpith awards so far and with more than fifteen hundred years of unbroken literary history, the available resources in internet to get acquainted with the language are not that much adequate as it should have been. Yet the state government of Karnataka, Kannada Ganaka Parishat, Kannada Abhivridhi Pradhikara, Kannada Sahithya Parishat and Kannada Knowledge Commission off late have been instrumental in framing some new fonts, software in Kannada for promoting Kannada in computer. Below are some of the resources in internet helpful in knowing Kannada.

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Medical Translation and Healthcare Industries

Accurate, effective communication is of utmost importance within the health care industry. Errors in the translation of documents, such as user manuals, patient information or medical questionnaires can literally make the difference between life and death.

This is why medical and other translations and localizations within all areas of the healthcare industry have to be consistently accurate.

When it comes to dealing with medical equipment of any kind, physician related services and general well being of patients, translations into Indian languages, for example, have to be culturally appropriate, clear and both sensitively and carefully handled.

Mistranslations or misinterpretations of therms and phrases can lead to very serious consequences. A badly translated informed consent form, for instance, could lead to a patient not being as informed as they should be about a procedure to be undertaken, and subsequently going on to sue a medical practitioner or hospital for misinformation or even malpractice.

This, of course, is not acceptable under any circumstances. For this reason, doctors will often use common, rather than medical terms in such forms. It allows a patient to clearly understand what is happening. A translator has to make sure such nuances are kept within the translation.

Legal requirements also need to be translated exactly, as opposed to being loosely interpreted. A a matter of fact, specific laws and recommendations relating to healthcare, privacy and language requirements have to be taken into consideration when translating medical documents to ensure appropriate localization and assistance for those living in other countries without speaking the language very well.

We, http://www.indianscripts.com ,  have the expertise to ensure that your documents will at all times be in compliance with these laws and recommendations. Our translators are trained and experienced in dealing with medical translations of all types.

Our company specializes in in particular in producing first class translations of patient information, informed consent forms, medical glossaries and medical questionnaires, as well as all kinds of biological, clinical, pharmaceutical and toxicological documents, software and equipment user manuals, brochures and packaging labels.

We are able to translate documents from English into 12 Indian languages, including Urdu, Telegu, Tamil, Punjabi, Oriya, and Nepali; Marathi, Malayalam, Kannada, Hindi, Gujarati and Bengali. http://www.indianscripts.com

Whether you require a brochure or packaging label to be localized for marketing a product in a Gujarati speaking area or whether you need patient information to be translated into Tamil to help a patient understand what is happening, our experts will ensure it is done perfectly and in compliance with all relevant laws.

The importance of the correctness of medical translations with regards to every aspect of healthcare can not be stressed enough. It has to be right at all times to ensure no lives are being put at risk through what seemed to be just minor errors at the time.

Do not take the risk of getting it wrong by allowing a bilingual staff member to do the translation. Get a quote from us now and see for yourself how cost-effective getting it right can be.

5 DIFFICULTIES IN TRANSLATING MEDICAL TEXTS INTO KANNADA

 

 

In the context of the serious nature of the medical field, translating a medical text into Kannada or any native language could be a challenge task. Getting your text translated correctly or wrongly could be a matter of life or death! A correct and apt translation on a consistent basis could take you to great professional heights, in the same way an inapt or misinterpreted text could land you in a problem ultimately ruining your translating career.

 

The medical text translation into Kannada is comparatively new, and thus the field has some limitations in itself. The medical field is growing fast and an ever changing field like this has to be supported with an equally proficient translation industry.

 

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THE PROCESS OF MEDICAL TRANSLATION IN KANNADA

Medical translation is the process of translating of clinical, technical, regulatory or marketing documentation and even software or training curriculum for the healthcare, medical device or pharmaceutical fields. In order to get a more accurate understanding of any medical devices or pharmaceuticals to be sold in a particular country, it is preferable get all the associated literature and labeling done in the language of that country. In addition to this, regulatory approval submissions have to be typically translated as well. The medical translation is necessary to enable the local clinicians conduct clinical trials, and for patients and regulatory representatives to be able to read them and get acquainted well with them.

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3 Ways to Improve your Gujarati Vocabulary

Article written by Indianscripts,  Language Translation Provider (www.indianscripts.com) who can be contacted at info@indianscripts.com

Guajarati is a beautiful language and a mention of Guajarati brings alive the memories of Mahatma Gandhi and his famous “Vaishno Vachan”. This Indo- Aryan language has its derivation from Western Rajasthani and is spoken in not only the state of Gujarat but also in Dadra and Nagar Haveli and Daman and Diu.

One can easily divide Gujarati as Old Gujarati, Middle Gujarati and Modern Gujarati, which is what the present world is speaking. If you too have recently joined the Guajarati fan club and want to improve your vocabulary of the language, then this article would turn out to be the best source for sure.

When we talk about Modern Gujarati, the basic categories that we should know include tadbhav, tatsam and loan words.

Tatsam: Same

If you look at the meaning of Tatsam literally, it means “same as that.” We should remember that Sanskrit language transformed in Indo Aryan of Middle age eventually. Thus, you will find many words that resemble the Sanskrit words. They are as it is employed in Gujarati and mean the same thing as well. In fact, Gujarati vocabulary is enriched by such words which are technical and formal in nature. For instance, lekhak which means writer remains lakhnār and word vijetā meaning winner stays jītnār in Gujarati. In order to recognize such words, you can see the markings and inflections on top of them.

Tadbhav: Nature of that

Gujarati has descended from the ancient Indian language Sanskrit and thus in Tadbhav category of words; one may find words of Sanskrit origin. Thus, these words have over the time transformed to provide people with the same character as that of modern Indo- Aryan language of modern times.

The basic difference between the Tatsam and Tadbhav words is that while the earlier are technical and formal, latter are words that may be used every day and thus are non- technical. To learn the spoken vernacular of Gujarati, these words are quite essential.

One should however remember that while speaking Gujarati, Tatsam and Tadbhav can be employed simultaneously.

Videśī Words: Loan Words

The above mentioned two categories are entirely different from this one which consists of words of foreign origin including, English, Persian, Arabic, Turkish and Portuguese. Since India had Muslim rule for quite some time and they were a Persian speaking clad, the Indian languages had seen employment of many such words. Gujarati too could not escape conjugation of these words and thus there are many etymologically foreign words called loan words in Gujarati language.

Article written by Indianscripts,  Language Translation Provider (www.indianscripts.com) who can be contacted at info@indianscripts.com

The loan words were eventually indigenized and the output are terms like dāvo which means claim, natījo meaning result, fāydo  meaning benefit, and hamlo which means attack. It is interesting to note that all above mentioned words have a masculine gender while there are words which are neutral as well, e.g., khānũ – compartment.

Over the years times have seen a big contrast in everything and languages do not lag behind. The same holds true for Gujarati language too and thus it is essential for any Gujarati lover to learn the vocabulary first to improvise the language.

Article written by Indianscripts,  Language Translation Provider (www.indianscripts.com) who can be contacted at info@indianscripts.com