A BRIEF HISTORY OF EVOLUTION OF KANNADA SCRIPTS

 

The Kannada script or the Kannada Lipi is basically derived from the ancient script of Brahmi.

 

There was an off-shoot from the original Brahmi script during the early 3rd century BC; this off-shoot gradually was developed as the script for Proto-Kannada. During the 4th century AD this script developed into the Kadamba script which again was derived as the Old Kannada script that existed till the 10th century AD. It is this Old Kannada script that is the mother of the modern day Kannada and Telugu scripts. So, it can be said that both Telugu and Kannada scripts have evolved from the same base of the ancient Brahmi script.

 

 

 

Kannada script is also used to write some of the other South Indian languages such as Kodava, Konkani and Tulu. Apart from the Devanagri script it is the script used to denote the second highest number of other languages. There is a historic evidence of Kannada being used in writing Badaga language of the Nilgiri region and also the Konkani in the Goa region where the script was named as Goykanadi. The present day Telugu script was derived from the Old Kannada script between the 11th and 14th century AD.

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KANNADA FOLK SONGS

 

A systematic study of folk literature began in Karnataka in about 1783 when Col. Colin McKenzie, a western scholar who traveled in many parts of Karnataka and collected valuable information regarding folk stories, medicines, rituals, legends, mythology and other customs. It is because of his enormous efforts that the information which was primarily oral got transformed into a written form. Later, the German missionary worker and a scholar Rev. Ferdinand Kittel and J.F. Fleet made some extensive studies in Kannada folklore. Kittel has compiled a number of proverbs collected from the general public and Fleet collected a number of folk songs and compiled them in his series of articles entitled “A Selection of Kanarese Ballads” in 1885.

 

 Contact info@indianscripts.com for translating medical documents into Kannada

 

In recent years, scholars such as L.R.Hegde, M.M.Kalburgi, Aravinda Malagathi, Karim Khan and H.L.Nagegowda have made considerable research work in the field of folk literature. The Kannada University of Hampi, the Karnataka Sahithya Academy, the Janapada and Yakshagana Academy and Karnataka Janapada Trust have played an active role in studies with an anthropological approach for collecting a vast body of knowledge concerned with the life of common man and some marginalized communities.

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KANNADA PROVERBS AND APHORISMS

 

Kannada has a vast and rich source of proverbs; they are mostly on the colloquial language and their origin could be as old as the language itself. They are mostly the sayings derived from the past experiences of the people about life; the sayings are full of wisdom and are intended to guide us through our life. The reliability of them is so sure that there is one proverb on the proverbs themselves- Veda sulladaru gaade sullagadu (Proverbs can never be proved wrong; they prevail even when Vedas could go wrong). From the past they have flowed from mouth to mouth without being actually recorded in any form, it was only in the later part of 19th century that some western scholars such as Col. Colin McKenzie, Rev. Ferdinand Kittel and J.F.Fleet began researching and recording some of the treasures of folk arts with respect to different and particular regions and also unique to some of the tribes and marginalized communities in Karnataka. After this many following western as well as Kannada scholars such as Mathigatta Krishnamurthy, D.Javaregouda, H.L.Nagegouda, Simpi Linganna, M.M.Kalburgi, Madenuru Sanganna, Chandrashekara Kambara and many others who realized the richness, relevance and life fullness of proverbs , gradually began collecting the available proverbs among the common people and have framed them in their collections. Continue http://www.indianscripts.com/Articles/KANNADA-PROVERBS-AND-APHORISMS.html

KANNADA CINEMA

Just as Hollywood is related to American Cinema and Bollywood to Hindi cinema, Sandalwood is the name given in relation to Kannada cinema. Gandhinagar in Bengaluru is the seat of Kannada cinema. Today more than a hundred films are made in Kannada, a few Tulu, Konkani, Kodava and Banjara films have also been made till now. There are about 650 cinema halls in Karnataka but one of the limitations of Kannada cinema is that it has a very much limited market outside of Karnataka. 

 

The first talkie in Kannada, Sati Sulochana was released in 1934; just three years after the first Hindi or Tamil talkie release in India. In the same year another Kannada talkie was released by name- Bhaktha Dhruva, both the productions were grand successes. The bane for the first movie makers in Kannada was that there were no facilities available in Karnataka to make movies indigenously. Both of the first movies in Kannada were shot, filmed, sound-recorded and post- produced outside Karnataka, there was a general lacking of studio facilities and technical crew members were not readily available in Karnataka.

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Medical Translation into Indic Languages

Medical translations require a great deal of skill and expertise at the best of times. Texts must be translated with extreme accuracy and according to a range of specific standards to ensure that no errors that could potentially have serious legal or even fatal consequences are made.

For most countries, translating a particular medical document typically means translating it into one specific national language. To translate, for instance, a user manual for medical equipment to be marketed across India, however, means getting the source language translated into a range of major Indian languages.

Every region of India has its own specific regional language, and with that, different ways of describing or referring to certain aspects of medical terms. This naturally requires specific knowledge of all the different variations and cultural differences within those regions and languages.

Translators will, among other things, have to have specific knowledge of certain terms used to describe particular conditions in different provinces.

A non-medical term or phrase used to describe the medical term ‘hypertension’ to make it more understandable for a patient, for example, may be totally different in Punjabi than it would be in Oriya, for instance.

Knowing these differences is vital to ensure that patients or their representatives are adequately informed and have no reason to sue a hospital or doctor for misinformation or in severe cases maybe even malpractice.

Most Indic language translation services will only translate documents into one or maybe two of these languages at a time, which means that the same document may have to be submitted to a whole list of agencies in order to get it localized for all areas within India.

We have assembled a team of highly trained experts that is able to translate a medical text of any kind from English into languages including Gujarati, Urdu, Hindi, Punjabi, Oriya and Bengali, as well as Tamil, Nepali, Malayalam, Kannada, Marathi and Telegu

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Our team members are all not only highly trained translators and specialized in medical translations; they are also well versed in the individual cultural aspects, attitudes, styles, etc applicable to each of these varying regions.

This means our clients can have a text, such as manual instructions for medical devices and equipment and/ or software, marketing brochures, training curriculums or packaging labels translated and localized for just about every province within India under one roof, at the same price for each translation.

The range of documents we specialize in also includes any other toxicological, clinical, pharmaceutical or biological documents, as well as medical questionnaires, patient information documents, glossaries of medical terminology or individual informed consent forms.

In other words, whether a Hindi medical translation is required to inform a patient of his condition or whether a complete Indic language translation for a new pharmaceutical product is required, our experts will be able to perform the task to the client’s greatest satisfaction and to the highest standards.

Whatever your requirement, contact us  info@indianscripts.com now for an example of our work and/ or a quote.

FIVE PITFALLS TO AVOID WHEN CHOOSING A MEDICAL TRANSLATOR IN KANNADA

 

Our world is shrinking fast; there is an easy and ready transfer of information from one part of the world to the other in an instance. When the information or service is not accessible in your native language translation is the window that we have got see through. Translation industry has grown into a big industry today, a fast developing and crucial field as medical translation ought to be perfect and give consistent quality products. Here are the five pitfalls that you can avoid in choosing a medical translator in Kannada.

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TRANSLATING INFORMED CONSENT FORMS INTO KANNADA

Informed consent forms are somewhat new in the Indian context, basically an informed consent is the consent obtained by a patient in writing, to undergo a medical or a surgical treatment or even to participate in an experiment only after the patient understands the actual risks involved in such a process. Informed consent is not just simply getting a patient to sign on a written consent form to undergo a treatment or participate in an experiment; it is a process of mutual communication between the physician and the patient that results in the patient’s authorization or agreement to undergo a specific medical intervention.

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